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Nuclear-weapon States meet in UK. Tell them to scrap nukes!!!

iran-nukes-cartoon-big

China, France, Russia, the UK and the US are meeting in London on 4-5 February to discuss what actions they are taking to implement their obligation under the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, adopted in 1969.

Their aim for the London meeting? To agree on nuclear weapons terminology.

Our aim for the meeting? To abolish nuclear weapons.

Below is a call to action from Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament UK, a founding member of Abolition 2000. Read more »

Activists hold mock funeral for the Earth at Washington State nuclear submarine base

Commemoration of Martin Luther King Jr Day

Mock funeral for Planet Earth at Bangor submarine base. Photo by L. Eiger, Ground Zero Center for Nonviolent Action

Mock funeral for Planet Earth at Bangor submarine base. Photo by L. Eiger, Ground Zero Center for Nonviolent Action

Activists from a local peace group blocked the main gate and staged a mock funeral at the Navy’s West Coast Trident nuclear submarine base in an act of civil resistance to nuclear weapons, on Saturday January 17, 2015. The action was part of the Ground Zero Center for Nonviolent Action’s annual celebration of Martin Luther King Jr’s life and legacy. The event concluded with a vigil and nonviolent direct action at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor in Silverdale, Washington. Read more »

Nuclear Futures

Nuclear Futures: Ten Minutes to Midnight

Nuclear Futures: Ten Minutes to Midnight

Exposing the legacy of the atomic age through creative arts

Nuclear Futures is a three-year program of arts activities, originating in Australia, and extending across six countries. It supports artists working with atomic survivor communities, to bear witness to the legacies of the atomic age through creative arts.

In Nuclear Futures, communities and artists use theatre, film, paintings and sculpture, literature, photography, digital arts and other art forms to make creative works that reflect both the horror of living with nuclear radiation, and the resilience of communities as they face the nuclear future. Read more »